How Coloring Can Help Your Child’s Development

Benefits of Coloring Books

Benefits of Coloring

There are many benefits of coloring that can help your child’s development in more ways than you can think. For many parents, a set of coloring books and crayons is a great go-to for any rainy day or time you want your kids to stay occupied. While coloring can be a good option for keeping kids quiet, they can be extremely advantageous for their overall mental and even physical development.

Handwriting and Hand-Eye Coordination

In order to improve handwriting, children need to build up certain strength and familiarity with holding objects like pens or pencils. A child’s first set of crayons is a great way to introduce them to writing utensils and their use. It can also help with the motor skills needed to execute good penmanship. As kids use crayons effectively to color within the lines, they are building up the dexterity needed to move a pen or pencil on paper.

Patience and Relaxation

For many kids, making it through a coloring page takes a great deal of patience. However, doing so can help them exercise this skill in other areas of their life, too. For many kids, and now adults, calmly coloring can prove to be an effective stress reliever and provides relaxation.

Focus

Linked closely with patience, coloring can help kids develop their ability to focus on a single task. The goal of finishing a picture provides them with the motivation to completely color the image. It has been proven that children who spend their time coloring have better concentration and focus skills.

Visual and Spatial Knowledge

Coloring a picture can help your children to recognize lines, perspective, color, hue, shape and form. Visually it helps them select colors for the image and begin to see the picture as a whole even before it is completely colored. Depending on the images they are coloring, kids can also become more familiar with and better able to recognize patterns.

Benefits of Personalized Coloring Books

Creativity and Imagination

Coloring sparks a child’s ability to make and create things. Coloring inside the lines and using the proper colors can demonstrate an understanding of the world around them. Even kids who use untraditional colors or go outside the lines are expressing themselves and unleashing their imagination in unique ways.

Color Recognition

Coloring is often a child’s first active experience with identifying and using color. It can help introduce them to different shades and hues, as well as other complexities of the color wheel. By deciding on what color to use next, kids are exercising their creative or critical thinking skills.

Language and Vocabulary Development

Whether your kids are actively coloring or just talking about it, coloring will give your kids an opportunity to learn new words and sentences. Using descriptive words to convey different styles of coloring sheets or variations of color, can help with language and vocabulary development.

Personalized Coloring Books

KD Novelties can take coloring a step further by providing personalized coloring and activity books. Starring the child’s name throughout these custom-made coloring books, can make coloring an even more immersive and interactive experience. Visually exciting, personalized activity books are full of funny characters, educational fun and has an emphasis on creativity. These amazingly awesome activity and coloring books are great for developing basic problem solving skills and entertaining children.

 

 

Make Book Reading a Sensory Experience

Book Reading a Sensory Experience

Ways to Make Book Reading a Sensory Experience

Making book reading a sensory experience can be fun when you involve the kids. We all use our senses to engage with and understand the world around us. The way that people interact with the world is different from person to person, and it can be especially particular for those on the spectrum. When it comes to special needs children, sometimes one or more senses are either over- or under-reactive to stimulation. Understanding how your child operates, what they respond to, and what they like can help make learning much more tangible for them. Reading a picture book aloud can be an active and engaging activity for children. It can be even more effective with the use of some simple strategies. Here are some ways how you can make reading a book aloud to your child more of a sensory experience.

Texture

Many children’s books might already have this ingredient, especially baby books. However,  for children on the spectrum, the addition of texture, fabrics, materials other than paper, and even props can help them engage with the story. If you have picture books, you can add your own textures with materials from any arts and craft stores such as felt, cotton balls, fur etc. where appropriate. You can customize books to be more interactive and encourage your child to interact with the book and the story even more.

Book Reading a Sensory Experience

Props and Visual Aids

Props and visual aids can be useful in many ways. It can help kids understand the story and recreate scenes and retell the story on their own. Thus, helping them retain information and develop a closer understanding of the story. Items like stuffed animals, toys resembling characters, felt board sets, sequencing cards, miniature objects and more can all be helpful and enriching.

Sounds

Adding sounds while reading can do a lot for kids, too.  You can ask your child to imitate farm animal sounds or any other actions that are included in the story like trains and cars. For kids who are minimally verbal or non-verbal, you can consider augmentative and alternative communication in place of sounds. This can include actions, miming, or pointing to certain things as they happen in the story.

Smell and Taste

Creating a more engaging atmosphere can be fun for reading, too. Adding candle scents or going outside to recreate the setting of the story can help your child  with their imagination. They can get a better grip on the characters are and what they are doing. If food or candy is mentioned, having some of the same on hand can be fun, and tasty, too.

Moving Around

This is a great way to not only add some exercise to your day but can make reading a far more active experience. You can get up and engage in the same activities as the characters in the story. You can also reenact entire scenes straight from the book. This encourages children to think about what the characters would do or what the story is about.  By approaching stories in different ways, you may find the one that reaches and affects your child the most.

Helping Kids Learn to Write

Helping Kids Learn to Write

Helping Kids Learn to Write

Writing is a valuable skill. Though formal letter writing on paper has died out, correspondence via email and other mediums is just as strong as ever. Helping kids learn to write well, or at least convey a thought or idea effectively, is necessary no matter what your profession.

For kids, learning to write well can be incredibly useful in their academic career. Especially since they will surely have to write papers and complete their homework effectively. However, writing can also lead to a hobby as well as increase their reading skills.

As we all know reading and writing are intrinsically linked. Being able to read well and understand concepts can help kids become better and more effective writers, and vice versa. With young kids, it helps to start small and simple, just like you would with reading. Here are some practical tips parents and guardians can try to get their kids into writing and make them better writers.

The Right Instruments

Just like how introducing babies to cardboard or fabric books can get kids acquainted with books as objects, picking out big, fun writing instruments can have the same effect.  You’ll first want to get kids acquainted with writing out or tracing letters. Safe options for younger children can include big pieces of chalk to draw with on the sidewalk or board. You can even get a little messy with paintbrushes or finger paints. Making this fun can be a great introduction to writing.

Start Small

Once your child has gotten the grasp of writing, they can move onto other writing tools. Golf pencils (smaller and easier to grip for small hands) or crayons are a great beginning. These tools are generally easier for kids to work with while they get used to the act of writing.

Personalized Activity Books

Getting the Hang of Things

As kids learn how to write out full sentences, they may need practice keeping their letters uniform and their spaces between words consistent. There are special kinds of paper that have traceable letters and other helpful tools such as personalized activity books for kids to get used to. To help with spaces between letters, they can use stamps, their fingers, or even colored crayons they aren’t using to act as placeholders while they write.

Becoming Better Writers

As kids get older, their homework may include instructions for providing long-form answers whether they be a single sentence to a paragraph. When kids are at this age or writing level, it helps to boost their communication skills. Encourage them to keep a journal or to write their own stories. This can help them develop effective communication skills via writing, and they can get used to expressing their thoughts, feelings, and ideas through written words.